featured
  • By DENISE LAVOIE AP Legal Affairs Writer
  • 0

FITCHBURG, Mass. — Police in more than 20 North American cities are testing the latest in less-lethal alternatives to bullets — "blunt impact projectiles" that cause suspects excruciating pain but stop short of killing them. Or at least that's the goal.

featured
  • by Sarah Kaplan Washington Post
  • 0

WASHINGTON — The birth of tiny twin pandas to the National Zoo's Mei Xiang was cause for national celebration this weekend (we are, after all, the country that practically went into a state of panic when the zoos's panda cam went offline during the shutdown of 2013).

web only
  • By Justin Sink Bloomberg News
  • 0

WASHINGTON — When President Barack Obama visits Alaska, he'll be greeted by politicians eager to show off their state's vast wilderness and stirring scenery -- and skeptical of White House plans to protect those resources.

web only
  • PAT EATON-ROBB Associated Press
  • 0

ELLINGTON, Conn. (AP) — Alex Kelly gained international infamy as the "preppy rapist" two decades ago while living an adrenaline-fueled life as a jet-set fugitive in Europe — skiing, hang gliding and mountain climbing before surrendering to face rape charges in Connecticut.

featured
  • By DAVID EGGERT Associated Press
  • 0

LANSING, Mich. — One newly exonerated inmate walks free every couple of months in Michigan, which has released more innocent prisoners than all but four states. Julie Baumer was one of them, missing four years of family life and career advancement due to a child abuse conviction after her ne…

featured
  • By CAIN BURDEAU Associated Press
  • 0

DELACROIX, La. — Rocky Morales is watching his small Louisiana town of Delacroix slowly melt into the water. The woods where he played hide-and-seek as a boy are gone. It's all water and mud back there now. So, too, is the nearby marsh where townsfolk once trapped for muskrat, otter and mink.

featured
  • by Jessica Contrera washington post
  • 0

Why do people care about Chelsea Clinton? Five years ago, all she wanted was a quiet wedding (of about 500 people). It required police barricades and a no-fly zone. Reporters chased her guests through the streets while savvy locals hawked Marc-and-Chelsea T-shirts and "I Do" pizzas. The Vera…

  • by Ben Terris Washington Post
  • 0

GORHAM, N.H. — Rod Webber perched on a ledge inside the old opera house, waiting for his moment as Jeb Bush answered questions at a candidate town hall meeting. He wore a top hat, a wrinkled tie, a suit vest and a daisy woven into his Old Testament-caliber beard. He clutched a bouquet of rum…

featured
  • By NASSER KARIMI Associated Press
  • 0

TEHRAN, Iran — Shortly after Iran reached a nuclear deal with world powers, a local newspaper in Tehran published an image that many outside the country would take for granted: An American actor hawking an expensive watch.

web only
  • By Tom Rowley The Washington Post
  • 0

CHICAGO — On the grounds of St. Sabina church on Chicago's South Side, there is an enormous wooden board, the sort that might normally display parish notices or invitations to block parties.

web only
  • CALEB JONES Associated Press
  • 0

HONOLULU (AP) — Atop Hawaii's Mauna Kea, where some Native Hawaiians have been peacefully protesting the construction of what would be one of the world's largest telescopes, astronomers have spent the last 40 years observing our universe and helping make some of the most significant discover…

  • By Keith Lawrence Messenger-Inquirer
  • 0

"Dang," Bubba said, as he settled into the chair at Axe's True Blue American Cafe & Barber Shoppe. "I guess I'm gonna have to buy me a herd of goats."

web only
  • By Justin Wm. Moyer
  • 0

Few journalists are lucky enough to stumble into stories that grab the national consciousness for decades. And when they do, even fewer are lucky enough to know their subjects intimately enough before the news breaks to offer readers not just a scoop, but a kind of dual biography.

web only
  • ZEINA KARAM, BRAM JANSSEN Associated Press
  • 0

SANLIURFA, Turkey (AP) — The children had all been shown videos of beheadings and told by their trainers with the Islamic State group that they would perform one someday. First, they had to practice technique. The more than 120 boys were each given a doll and a sword and told, cut off its head.

web only
  • By Sari Horwitz The Washington Post
  • 0

FORT WORTH, Texas — Sharanda Jones — prisoner 33177-077 — struggled to describe the moment in 1999 when a federal judge sentenced her to life in prison after her conviction on a single cocaine-related offense.

web only
  • MIKE CORDER Associated Press
  • 0

ROTTERDAM, Netherlands (AP) — On their son Bryce's birthday this year, Silene Fredriksz-Hoogzand and her husband Rob went to a Dutch air base, watched pall bearers solemnly unload seven coffins from a military cargo plane and wondered if they contained parts of the remains of Bryce or his gi…

web only
  • By Kevin Sullivan The Washington Post
  • 0

BASTROP, Texas — The office of the Bastrop County Republican Party is in an old lumber mill on Main Street, with peeling brown paint and a sign out front that captures the party's feelings about the Obama administration: "WISE UP AMERICA!"

web only
  • LYNNE O'DONNELL Associated Press
  • 0

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Afghanistan's first lady has broken numerous conventions in a society that traditionally sequesters women behind closed doors — speaking out on issues such as violence against women, the rule of law and the power of religion. But perhaps Rula Ghani's biggest taboo b…

web only
  • By Joby Warrick The Washington Post
  • 0

A government fund that has helped preserve some of the nation's most iconic parks — from Gettysburg's battlefields to the Everglades and the Appalachian Trail — could disappear as early as fall because of a congressional dispute over how the program's revenues should be spent, U.S. officials warn.

web only
  • ERICA WERNER Associated Press
  • 0

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Democrats are claiming early success in recruiting strong candidates in Republican-held states as they fight to retake the majority after last year's midterm bloodletting. But in several states the party is still searching, with the Democrat who looks like the strong…

web only
  • TAMARA LUSH Associated Press
  • 0

LABELLE, Fla. (AP) — Tucked away in Florida's Hendry County, amid the scrub brush and saw palmetto grasslands just southwest of Lake Okeechobee, are three monkey breeding farms containing thousands of primates.

web only
  • By Steve Hendrix The Washington Post
  • 0

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — Mike Huckabee takes the stage in this cavernous mega-church and the faithful take to their feet. He holds up his hands, beaming, flanked on billboard-size video monitors by two simulcast Mike Huckabees, his boxy black suit silhouetted by 2,400 square feet of American flag…

web only
  • By Robert Samuels The Washington Post
  • 0

The black man courting crowds of white conservatives doesn't seem like the same guy that H. Westley Phillips once idolized. Phillips still relishes the day he heard Ben Carson inspire minority students at Yale University with his story of persistence. He can still feel the nervous anticipati…

web only
  • By Todd C. Frankel The Washington Post
  • 0

INSIDE HOOVER DAM — The floor rumbled under Mark Cook. His legs vibrated as he stood in a tunnel tucked into the thick base of Hoover Dam, 430 feet below the tourists looking out over Lake Mead. Beneath him, water roared through steel pipes 13 feet tall. Nearby, heavy turbines hummed with me…

web only
  • RAHIM FAIEZ, LYNNE O'DONNELL Associated Press
  • 0

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Starved and beaten by his stepmother, the little boy with big brown eyes was already withdrawn and unhappy by the time his father banished him from the family home and sent him to an orphanage in the Afghan capital, Kabul.