Logsdon, as an eighth-grader, makes huge impact for Cougars 1

Just an eighth-grader, Jack Logsdon leads Grayson County in scoring this season.

At an early age, Grayson County eighth-grader Jack Logsdon is finding out that hard work pays off.

It’s common for Cougars’ head coach Travis Johnston on many weekends to get a text message from Logsdon to see if he can get the coach’s key card to get into the school gymnasium to get in some extra shooting.

Days off for the 6-foot-5, 175-pound Logsdon, he says, are rare and it’s paying big dividends as he averages 15.3 points and 5.9 rebounds a game.

He said so far this season he is most pleased with how he’s “scoring the ball and playing defense recently.”

At just 14, Logsdon often is playing against opponents three and four years older than he is, and it’s a challenge he says he doesn’t shy away from.

“I approach it just like any game — just play,” he said.

He was introduced to the rigors of varsity basketball last season when he played in all 29 games for the Cougars and averaged 3.2 points and 2.7 rebounds a game.

“…He’s kind of hitting his stride in games and playing pretty well and that’s kind of driving him,” Johnston said. “He’s seeing the results and sees that he needs to keep putting the time in.

“We ask him to do a lot more than we realize, especially being just 14-years-old,” Johnston said, “but he can handle it. He’s mature enough and he’s talented enough and mentally tough enough to handle the basketball load, not necessarily the getting onto him as much, but he can handle the basketball load.”

In his first game this season, a win at Breckinridge County, Logsdon scored a team-high 21 points and buried 4-of-7 3-point attempts.

“My 3-point shooting has been pretty good this year,” said Logsdon, who also plays baseball. “I’ve always shot 3s fairly well.”

What makes Logsdon dangerous on the offensive end of the floor is that he can score in a number of ways.

“He’s a three-level scorer and he needs to get better at his pull-up game off the bounce and that should come with quickness and strength, but he can get to the rim and obviously he’s a really good free-throw shooter and he’s our best 3-point shooter as well,” Johnston said. “When you’re at 6-5, it’s a lot easier to be able to score when you’re a three-level guy like he is.”

Through 17 games, Logsdon was shooting 33.3% on 3-pointers (28-of-84) and 80% at the line (80-of-100).

Logsdon is part of an eighth-grade class that Johnston expects big things from. In addition to Logsdon, Kadin Hanshaw and Spencer Langdon form a big part of the Cougars’ future.

Hanshaw is averaging 6.1 points a game, while Langdon has been dealing with a foot injury the entire season.

Logsdon said his favorite basketball player is Boston Celtics’ star Jayson Tatum and he tries to pattern his game around the versatile Tatum.

“He does everything well,” he said.

Logsdon will play AAU ball this summer with a team in a program led by ex-NBA player Rajon Rondo. Last summer he played on a team out of Cincinnati.

Like most younger players, offense comes easier to Logsdon then defense.

“We kind of got on to him about his defense and since then he’s gotten a little more active on defense,” Johnston said. “It also helps that the ball is going in the hole for him. Everybody likes to play defense a lot more when they’re scoring. Things are going good for him right now. I’d like to see how tough he is when some of his shots don’t fall, but I also don’t want to see that day when his shots don’t fall.”

Jeff D’Alessio can be reached at jdalessio@thenewsenterprise.com

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