I continue from last week, with Livermore businesses from the 1970s. Country Carpets’ slogan was, “Total Service Equals Total Customer Satisfact- ion.” If you wanted to buy or sell good used furniture, you’d stop by Leo’s Used Furniture, on Second St. If you needed cabinets, there was Livermore Custom Cabinets. Free & Jarvis Building Supply offered “A complete line of building material; check our prices before you drive 20 miles to buy.” Hatfield Lumber and Hardware sold “All types of gifts and Sunbeam appliances and more.” Livermore Furniture & Hardware said “Let this be a furniture year; give her that breakfast set she has always wanted.” Ralph Wetzel, owner of Gambles, adjacent to the IGA, reported that “Merlin,” an electronic game, was the number one item in his store in Dec. 1979. Another big seller was “game boards;” senior citizens kept cleaning out his supplies of those items.

Farmers and Merchants Bank said, “Our Interest is Personal.” First Federal Savings and Loan Assn said, “We help your money work for you,” and claimed the highest interest rates in McLean County, with 5 1/4% on Flexible Passbook savings. Insurance companies in town were McLean County Insurance Agency and the Rough River Insurance Agency, both of which only advertised by name. Dr. John Guenther opened his dental practice in Livermore in 1971, in the former Farmers and Merchants Bank building. Green Valley Drugs offered prescription services, gift items, jewelry, cosmetics, toys, cameras and more. Chester Hoover opened his CPA business in 1978, and is still in business.

McLean County Mobile Homes, Inc. offered you “the largest selection of quality homes in the McLean County area, and on-lot bank financing.” Chapman Mobile Homes, with “22 used homes in stock,” was “Your housing expert.” If you didn’t want to be bothered with maintenance, you could apply to Livermore Heights Apartments, where in 1972 one ad said, “Rent based upon income; minimum rent for 1-bedroom, $43; minimum rent for 2-bedroom, $47. All utilities furnished; new stove and refrigerator also included.” Wow!

Muster Funeral Home had an ambulance service, which was also available in Calhoun. McLean County Farm Supply, on 136, said, “For all your farming needs, check with us.” Nifty Deluxe Cleaners and Shirt Laundry was where “Service and quality come first.” The Self-Service Laundry, on 136, said “Clean Surroundings make a cleaner wash.” They had “filtered water,” and “Attendant on duty will do laundry for a nominal fee.”

Peercy’s IGA, Inc. now had IGAs in Livermore, Calhoun & Sacramento. There was also Mary’s Grocery Store in Livermore. The Kwik-Pik Market offered a 5-cent cup of hot coffee with purchase of a breakfast sandwich, and “Coffee cup lids available for take out.” (That must have been a new thing.) The E-Z Food Market, at the foot of the bridge on Hwy 431, owned by J.C. (Goo-Goo) Buchanan, featured a complete line of groceries, ice, fish bait, and Stewart Hot Sandwiches.

The many beauty and barber shops included Suggestion Beauty Shop, from the 1960s; Sue’s Beauty Shop, on 5th Street; Juanita’s Beauty Shop; Barbara’s Beauty Shop; Joyce’s Beauty Shop, on the alley between 6th and 7th, just west of Main; Connie’s Beauty Shop, which offered perms, styles, frosting and colors. One special was a regular $20 perm for $15 with stylist Katrina Cobb; Thacker’s Barber Shop, with barber Art Thacker, located at 3rd and Elm; and Shelton’s Barber Shop.

Anderson’s Restaurant, advertised as the most modern facility in the area, invited you to stop by for “a cup of coffee, a meal, or a banquet.” They offered “Chin Wipin’ Good Fried Chic’n by the box, plate or bucketful,” and besides serving breakfast, lunch and dinner, they also offered steaks, chops, and seafood. Angelo’s Pizza became Geno’s Pizza in 1978, and had a coupon offering $2 off a large or jumbo Italian pizza on Tuesday & Wednesday nights. The 431 Diner reopened in 1978 as Triple J. The Lantern (formerly Anderson’s) had “Good Home Cooking” In 1977 they offered catfish fiddlers on Friday nights, with French fries or potato salad, hush puppies and slaw for $2.95. Mama and Mia’s Pizza, at the “Y” of 431 and 136, was an Italian food and pizza restaurant, featuring Stromboli and everything-on-it pizza. Gray’s Dairy Bar offered soft ice cream, sandwiches, sundaes and milk shakes. One weekend special was 10 hamburgers for $3.00.

T & W Fashions, owned by Patsy West, had fashions for Ladies & Girls, plus Misses sizes, Women’s half sizes, and some Stout sizes. There was the Livermore Florist; Welborn’s Florist: “Design makes the difference,” with hanging and potted plants, corsages, terrariums and more; and Amber’s Florist & Gift Shop, which offered fresh flowers for all occasions, permanent flower arrangements, handmade gifts, and oil paintings by local artists.

The Livermore Bait Shop, on 431, advertised “Minnows now in stock,” and had “Everything for the fisherman.” For entertainment, the Armory had dances from time to time. In 1970 one dance band was the Nomads (from Owensboro), and admission was $1.25 per person. Next week, I’ll cover another town.

The Museum and the Treasure House are open Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, the Museum from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., and the Treasure House from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. We’re located at 540 Main St., Calhoun, and our number is 270-499-5033. We hope you’ll visit us soon!

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