Daviess Fiscal Court is set to purchase new voting machines to replace the county’s aging machines.

Jordan Johnson, assistant county treasurer, said Wednesday that the new machines will be delivered by Nov. 1.

Fiscal Court is set to award a $346,011 bid to Harp Enterprises to purchase 56 voting machines, 56 ADA compliant voting machines, 20 printers and a central tabulating system and software.

The bid also includes a maintenance agreement and a contract for Harp technicians to program the machines for elections through 2029. The cost for programming is estimated, because every election cycle may not have a primary.

If there is a primary election every cycle, the total estimated cost for Harp’s equipment and services is $794,111. The other bidder, Election Systems and Software LLC, submitted a bid of $485,652 for voting equipment and had a total estimated total cost of $1.010 million through 2029.

The new machines will not connect remotely, Johnson said.

Also, “the central tabulation unit will have no way to be connected to wireless or the Internet,” Johnson said.

The bid calls for machine data to be captured by flash drives. Clerks office officials said previously that all of the machines will allow voters to vote on paper ballots, for vote tally verification.

County Clerk Leslie McCarty said the county’s election plan calls for enough equipment to have a printer and voting machines at voting centers and early voting centers, and backup equipment.

“We’ll have 12 to 18 centers, depending on the year,” McCarty said Wednesday.

The new voting machines have multiple benefits over the machines being replaced, McCarty said.

“They’re brand new; our (current) machines are 15 to 20 years old,” McCarty said.

The old machines weren’t picking up slight marks on ballots, she said.

“We learned that during the recount” in 2019, when the clerk’s office had to recount ballots in the 13th District State House race, McCarty said.

“I think the public is going to be very pleased with the machines we purchased,” she said.

Johnson said the machines will arrive in time for elections staff to be trained in time for a spring primary next year.

“There will be plenty to time for everyone to get up to speed,” Johnson said.

James Mayse, 270-691-7303, jmayse@messenger-inquirer.com, Twitter: @JamesMayse

James Mayse, 270-691-7303, jmayse@messenger-inquirer.com, Twitter: @JamesMayse

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