Joslin to perform at Hall of Fame Saturday

Chris Joslin, executive director of the Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame & Museum, will play three performances Saturday in the museum’s “Festival Era” section during museum tours.

The Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame & Museum will feature three performances by Chris Joslin, its executive director, on Saturday in “The Festival Era” section.

The performance is “equal parts entertainment, instrument demonstration, sing-a-long and education,” Joslin said.

It’s included in the admission price for touring the museum.

Joslin said since the museum reopened from the pandemic on June 17, it has welcomed visitors from Kentucky, Nebraska, North Carolina, Georgia, Texas, Alabama, Indiana, Illinois, Tennessee and South Dakota.

ROMP, the Hall of Fame’s signature festival, which drew more than 25,000 people from around the world to Yellow Creek Park last year, was canceled this year by the coronavirus pandemic.

But the museum streamed 20 hours of performances from past years on ROMPFEST.com, Facebook and Instagram last week during the time ROMP had been scheduled.

Carly Smith, the Hall’s marketing director, said, “We don’t have an accurate count of how many people watched it online, but we had a ton of views.”

She said, “84% were from the U.S. It was well received.”

Smith said the Hall’s gift shop “had close to one-third of our normal ROMP sales last week. That includes locals who came in and people who ordered online.”

She said, “We had a pre-sale on the virtual ROMP T-shirts. We sold a lot of those. And we had some shirts that we ordered the week before this all happened. They are still available in the gift shop.”

Joslin said the museum is open from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday.

His performances will be at 11:30 a.m. and 1 and 3 p.m.

Joslin plays banjo, dobro, guitar and mandolin.

He has performed and recorded with several artists in Nashville, performed on the Grand Ole Opry with Mike Snider and performed at ROMP with Old Crow Medicine Show and Sam Bush.

Joslin said, “Before we closed to the public in mid-March due to COVID-19, we routinely hosted large groups from the travel industry, schools, private tour groups, and local church groups, and almost always included a live music component. Bluegrass is rich in history but is best experienced through the music.”

Because of pandemic restrictions, only 26 people will be allowed to attend each performance, he said.

Joslin suggested that people arrive 30 minutes before each performance if they want to be sure they can get in.

New inductees

The International Bluegrass Music Association, which inducts musicians into the Hall of Fame, announced last week that New Grass Revival, The Johnson Mountain Boys and J.T. Gray will be inducted this year.

New Grass Revival, which gave its name to “newgrass music,” was active from 1971 to 1989.

Members at various times included Sam Bush, Courtney Johnson, Ebo Walker, Curtis Burch, Butch Robins, John Cowan, Béla Fleck and Pat Flynn.

The Johnson Mountain Boys, active from 1978 to 1988, included Dudley Connell, Richard Underwood, Eddie D’Zmura, David McLaughlin, Eddie Stubbs, Larry Robbins, Tom Adams, Marshall Wilborn and Earl Yager at various times.

J.T. Gray, a musician who performed with the Misty Mountain Boys, Vassar Clements, The Sullivan Family and Jimmy Martin’s Sunny Mountain Boys, is best known as the owner of The Station Inn, which has hosted bluegrass music in Nashville regularly since 1981.

Keith Lawrence 270-691-7301 klawrence@messenger-inquirer.com

Keith Lawrence 270-691-7301

klawrence@messenger-inquirer.com

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