The Daviess County Confederate Monument Relocation Committee will finalize recommendations for the resting place of the controversial Daviess County Confederate statue on Wednesday, Nov. 18.

On Nov. 11, committee chair Aloma Dew, along with committee members Kenny Barr, Tim Kline, Wesley Acton and Anne Damron, met via Zoom to narrow down suggestions from the community and members regarding the fate of the statue with committee members unanimously landing on two recommendations to present to Daviess Fiscal Court — The Owensboro Museum of Science and History and the Owensboro Museum of Fine Art.

The caveat to these recommendations is that the statue would be separated from its immense base with the base being relocated to the site of the Battle of Panther Creek on U.S. 431.

Relocating the statue to Elmwood Cemetery was a popular option to both the public and committee members but after Kline’s correspondence with the owners of Elmwood yielded a no, the committee opted to leave the cemetery out of the recommendations.

As of the committee’s vote on Wednesday to finalize the recommendations, where the statue eventually ends up will be in the hands of the court, said Daviess County Judge-Executive Al Mattingly.

“Right now, we are awaiting their recommendations,” he said. “The next step will be to take their recommendations under advisement and discuss their feasibility as a commission. For right now, the court does not have a deadline for when we will make a determination on where the statue will be moved.”

The final meeting of the Daviess County Confederate Monument Relocation Committee will take place at 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 18, via the Daviess Fiscal Court’s Facebook page.

Fiscal Court voted unanimously on Aug. 6 to establish a committee that would help provide options as to where to relocate the 120-year-old Confederate soldier statue that resides on the courthouse lawn at Third and Frederica streets.

The statue, as with other Confederate monuments across the country, has been a point of controversy as racial tensions have escalated this year with the police-involved shootings of Blacks.

Jacob Mulliken, 270-228-2837, jmulliken@messenger-inquirer.com

Jacob Mulliken, 270-228-2837, jmulliken@messenger-inquirer.com

(1) comment

STEVE GARDNER

Move it to Ohio County with the rickhouses.

Gardner

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