Lawyer: John Hinckley interested in music industry job

Associated Press | Evan Vucci, File

FILE - In this Nov. 18, 2003 file photo, John Hinckley Jr. arrives at U.S. District Court in Washington. The man who tried to assassinate President Ronald Reagan is interested in getting a job in the music industry, possibly in California. That’s what a lawyer for 64-year-old John Hinckley Jr. told a judge at a court hearing Tuesday in Washington. But a prosecutor said that would give the government “great pause.â€

Hinckley interested in music industry job, lawyer says

WASHINGTON — The man who tried to assassinate President Ronald Reagan is interested in getting a job in the music industry, possibly in California, his lawyer said at a court hearing in Washington on Tuesday.

John Hinckley Jr., 64, lives in Virginia and was not present at the hearing. A prosecutor said allowing Hinckley to relocate to California for a music industry job would give the government "great pause."

Hinckley spent decades living at a psychiatric hospital in Washington after being found not guilty by reason of insanity in the 1981 shooting that injured Reagan and three others. But health professionals have said that the mental illness that the 25-year-old Hinckley was suffering from when he shot Reagan has been in full and stable remission for decades.

The judge said that while he'd consider fewer restrictions, he wants answers about Hinckley's future. He asked about a plan for where Hinckley would live if his mother needs to move to an assisted living facility or dies. He also noted that Hinckley has benefited from the team of mental health professionals around him but said that some of them are considering retirement. He asked to know more about Hinckley's care going forward.

Famed photographer Frank dies

NEW YORK — Robert Frank, a giant of 20th-century photography whose seminal book "The Americans" captured singular, candid moments of the 1950s and helped free picture-taking from the boundaries of clean lighting and linear composition, has died. He was 94.

Frank died Monday in Inverness, on Cape Breton Island in Nova Scotia, according to his second wife, June Leaf. The couple divided their time between Nova Scotia and New York.

The Swiss-born Frank influenced countless photographers and was likened to Alexis de Tocqueville for so vividly capturing the United States through the eyes of a foreigner. Besides his still photography, Frank was a prolific filmmaker, creating more than 30 movies and videos, including a cult favorite about the Beats and a graphic, censored documentary of the Rolling Stones' 1972 tour. Black-and-white Super 8 pictures by Frank were featured on the cover of the Stones' "Exile On Main Street," one of rock 'n' roll's most acclaimed albums.

On Thursday, the band tweeted a tribute to Frank, calling him an "incredible artist whose unique style broke the mold."

But he was best known for "The Americans," a montage that countered the 1950s myth of bland prosperity and opened vast new possibilities for photography, shifting the paradigm from the portrait to the snapshot. As essential to post-war culture as a Chuck Berry song or a Beat poem, Frank's shots featured jukeboxes, luncheonettes, cigars, big cars and endless highways, with an American flag often in the picture.

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